It’s time again for the monthly Smithereens Cartoon Caption Contest. Go here to enter.

It’s time again for the monthly Smithereens Cartoon Caption Contest. Go here to enter.

Where most people see charred remains of a burned apartment building, fire investigators see a giant puzzle to be solved. And they do solve it.
The Las Vegas Sun got a behind-the-scenes look at a fire from the perspective of fire investigators for Las Vegas Fire and Rescue. They respond to blazes that have reached two-alarm status, injured people, caused more than $50,000 in damage, involved city property or seemed suspicious in nature.
Click here to read more about the investigators and see more photos of the fire and the search for its cause.
(Photo above by Sam Morris / Las Vegas Sun)

Where most people see charred remains of a burned apartment building, fire investigators see a giant puzzle to be solved. And they do solve it.

The Las Vegas Sun got a behind-the-scenes look at a fire from the perspective of fire investigators for Las Vegas Fire and Rescue. They respond to blazes that have reached two-alarm status, injured people, caused more than $50,000 in damage, involved city property or seemed suspicious in nature.

Click here to read more about the investigators and see more photos of the fire and the search for its cause.

(Photo above by Sam Morris / Las Vegas Sun)

A major explosion rocked the Las Vegas Valley 24 years ago Friday, killing two people and injuring 350.
The May 4, 1988, explosions at the Pacific Engineering Production Company of Nevada (PEPCON) plant registered 3.5 on a Richter Scale 215 miles away in California and caused $70 million in damage in Southern Nevada.
The Las Vegas Sun file photo above shows Fred Gibson Jr., the president of PEPCON, talking about the explosions shortly after they happened.
Click here to read more about the disaster.
(Photo by Craig Wallace / Las Vegas Sun file)

A major explosion rocked the Las Vegas Valley 24 years ago Friday, killing two people and injuring 350.

The May 4, 1988, explosions at the Pacific Engineering Production Company of Nevada (PEPCON) plant registered 3.5 on a Richter Scale 215 miles away in California and caused $70 million in damage in Southern Nevada.

The Las Vegas Sun file photo above shows Fred Gibson Jr., the president of PEPCON, talking about the explosions shortly after they happened.

Click here to read more about the disaster.

(Photo by Craig Wallace / Las Vegas Sun file)

The Stratosphere has a new look, in fact, the past two years have brought it a renaissance of rooms and explosion of gourmet food that have drawn visitors from middle America and across Europe looking to roll into Vegas on a tight budget.
The $20 million in renovations that began two years ago at the 1996 resort still may remain hidden on the north end of the Strip, where the lights don’t shine as brightly. But the new amenities are impressing people who may be wandering in merely to look out over the valley from 1,149 feet.
Click here to read more about the renovations from Sun gaming reporter Ron Sylvester, or read about how the Stratosphere has changed up its nightlife in this post from John Katsilometes.
(Photo by Leila Navidi / Las Vegas Sun)

The Stratosphere has a new look, in fact, the past two years have brought it a renaissance of rooms and explosion of gourmet food that have drawn visitors from middle America and across Europe looking to roll into Vegas on a tight budget.

The $20 million in renovations that began two years ago at the 1996 resort still may remain hidden on the north end of the Strip, where the lights don’t shine as brightly. But the new amenities are impressing people who may be wandering in merely to look out over the valley from 1,149 feet.

Click here to read more about the renovations from Sun gaming reporter Ron Sylvester, or read about how the Stratosphere has changed up its nightlife in this post from John Katsilometes.

(Photo by Leila Navidi / Las Vegas Sun)

The Sahara – one of the oldest hotel-casinos on the Las Vegas Strip – closed less than a year ago. Now we know a little bit more about what is in store for the famous landmark.
Debt rating agency Moody’s Investors Service in New York issued a report that confirmed the redeveloped property would be called ”SLS Las Vegas” and that hotelier Sam Nazarian was hoping to reopen it in the second quarter of 2014 — if he can raise $415 million from lenders and investors to help finance what’s being billed as a $744 million project.
Click here for more on Nazarian’s plans, or here for more on the old Sahara.
(Photo by Leila Navidi / Las Vegas Sun)

The Sahara – one of the oldest hotel-casinos on the Las Vegas Strip – closed less than a year ago. Now we know a little bit more about what is in store for the famous landmark.

Debt rating agency Moody’s Investors Service in New York issued a report that confirmed the redeveloped property would be called ”SLS Las Vegas” and that hotelier Sam Nazarian was hoping to reopen it in the second quarter of 2014 — if he can raise $415 million from lenders and investors to help finance what’s being billed as a $744 million project.

Click here for more on Nazarian’s plans, or here for more on the old Sahara.

(Photo by Leila Navidi / Las Vegas Sun)

With Sunday’s return of “Mad Men”, the AMC series examining life on Madison Avenue during the 1960s, it seems like an appropriate time to take a look back at Las Vegas advertising from the era.
Following the lead of New Yorker, which recently saluted the show by republishing classic ads that first appeared in its pages in the ’60s, Sun staff delved into the newspaper’s archives and resurrected some ads from March 1963.
Cars. Casinos. Smooth whiskey. Surely, Las Vegas of the early ’60s would have been Don Draper’s kind of town.
As the show returns after a lengthy hiatus stemming from a dispute between its creator and AMC, come along on a nostalgia trip, Sun-style.
It’s going to be a swingin’ time.

With Sunday’s return of “Mad Men”, the AMC series examining life on Madison Avenue during the 1960s, it seems like an appropriate time to take a look back at Las Vegas advertising from the era.

Following the lead of New Yorker, which recently saluted the show by republishing classic ads that first appeared in its pages in the ’60s, Sun staff delved into the newspaper’s archives and resurrected some ads from March 1963.

Cars. Casinos. Smooth whiskey. Surely, Las Vegas of the early ’60s would have been Don Draper’s kind of town.

As the show returns after a lengthy hiatus stemming from a dispute between its creator and AMC, come along on a nostalgia trip, Sun-style.

It’s going to be a swingin’ time.

Fantasy sports are about to meet legal sports betting in Las Vegas casinos.
Next Monday, Cantor Gaming will unveil a new betting option called “the Cantor Five” at its empire of local sports books. Cantor will choose a team of five NBA players every day and allow bettors to do the same.
Based on a scoring system similar to fantasy basketball, Cantor’s computer will then formulate a line on the matchup. Bettors can wager on either Cantor’s team or their own against the spread.
Click here for more info.
(Photo by Steve Marcus / Las Vegas Sun)

Fantasy sports are about to meet legal sports betting in Las Vegas casinos.

Next Monday, Cantor Gaming will unveil a new betting option called “the Cantor Five” at its empire of local sports books. Cantor will choose a team of five NBA players every day and allow bettors to do the same.

Based on a scoring system similar to fantasy basketball, Cantor’s computer will then formulate a line on the matchup. Bettors can wager on either Cantor’s team or their own against the spread.

Click here for more info.

(Photo by Steve Marcus / Las Vegas Sun)

Ever crave an orange-flavored Diet Coke or a Peach Sprite? A touch-screen soda fountain designed by Coca-Cola is popping up at fast-food restaurants around Las Vegas, offering more than 100 different flavor combinations sure to please even the most adventurous soda connoisseurs.
Click here to read more about the machines and for a map of all the local places you can try the machines.
(Photo by Leila Navidi / Las Vegas Sun)

Ever crave an orange-flavored Diet Coke or a Peach Sprite? A touch-screen soda fountain designed by Coca-Cola is popping up at fast-food restaurants around Las Vegas, offering more than 100 different flavor combinations sure to please even the most adventurous soda connoisseurs.

Click here to read more about the machines and for a map of all the local places you can try the machines.

(Photo by Leila Navidi / Las Vegas Sun)

An Elvis impersonator marries John Walker, 52, and Debbie Dieterich, 48, during their leap-year wedding ceremony on  Wednesday, February 29, 2012, at the Viva Las Vegas Wedding Chapel on the Las Vegas Strip.
Weddings are always big business in Las Vegas, but especially on memorable days like Leap Day.
(Photo by Mona Shield Payne for the Las Vegas Sun)

An Elvis impersonator marries John Walker, 52, and Debbie Dieterich, 48, during their leap-year wedding ceremony on Wednesday, February 29, 2012, at the Viva Las Vegas Wedding Chapel on the Las Vegas Strip.

Weddings are always big business in Las Vegas, but especially on memorable days like Leap Day.

(Photo by Mona Shield Payne for the Las Vegas Sun)

Yes. That really is Mike Tyson with a pigeon.
Tyson, the former heavyweight champion who breeds pigeons at his Las Vegas-area home, is preparing for a new show — about himself.
Set to debut April 13 at MGM Grand’s Hollywood Theatre is “Mike  Tyson: Undisputed Truth — Live on Stage.”
Las Vegas Sun columnist John Katsilometes sat with Tyson at his home to get an idea of what Tyson will be talking about and to see what life is like for him now.
(Photo by Steve Marcus / Las Vegas Sun)

Yes. That really is Mike Tyson with a pigeon.

Tyson, the former heavyweight champion who breeds pigeons at his Las Vegas-area home, is preparing for a new show — about himself.

Set to debut April 13 at MGM Grand’s Hollywood Theatre is “Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth — Live on Stage.”

Las Vegas Sun columnist John Katsilometes sat with Tyson at his home to get an idea of what Tyson will be talking about and to see what life is like for him now.

(Photo by Steve Marcus / Las Vegas Sun)